Provocative Coaching

A highly practical book that provides a theoretical framework on the workings of provocative coaching for all practitioners.

Provocative Coaching ISBN: 978-1845908577

Provocative Coaching

By Jaap Hollander

RRP: £18.99


Crown House | press@crownhouse.co.uk

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A highly practical book that provides a theoretical framework on the workings of provocative coaching for all practitioners. A fresh wind is blowing through the worlds of coaching and psychotherapy! It's a unique new cocktail of humour, warmth and psychological provocation.

Provocative Coaching introduces new and innovative coaching and therapy methods getting us to laugh about our own problems. Coaches and therapists everywhere are throwing off the shackles of humming and nodding! Not only can provocative coaching be highly effective- especially with the so called impossible clients, but it liberates professionals as well as their clients!

This is a book about challenging people in order to help them. It explains in detail how to do Provocative Coaching and the psychological mechanisms, through which the provocative style works. It may seem like quite an unusual way of behaving for a professional coach or therapist however humour is an important aspect. Provocative Coaching is related to paradoxical intention and reverse psychology .

Frank Farrelly, the founding father of Provocative Therapy says about author Jaap Hollander: I am very much impressed with Jaap s book. Most people do get the confrontational aspect of provocative therapy but Jaap is one of the few who also understands how important humour is. It is like listening to a master violinist at work, playing the instrument with great skill and intelligence .


Anonymous

Provocative Coaching by Jaap Hollander

I was really looking forward to reading this book and jumped at the chance to write a review. I have used the provocative approach successfully in the past and was interested in finding out some of the theory behind it. The way in which it is written was incredibly frustrating, almost like attending a workshop by proxy and not at all satisfying thanks to endless transcripts. Jaap’s approach involves a lot of humour and I’m all for that but I’m pretty good at recognising humour when I read it; I know it’s a transcript and don’t need to be told that the audience laughed.

The book re-enforced my belief that the provocative approach can be a very useful tool to facilitate change. When he talks about ‘The Farrelly Factors’ in chapter three, Jaap implies a justification for his approach but I’d have preferred to have been at the workshop, reading the book was hard work! I don’t want to be unfair to the guy as there is a lot of good content, but for me the style of delivery got in the way.


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